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Widespread flooding disrupts harvest | The Australian


Farmers in northern New South Wales have returned to harvesting crops, after heavy rain caused widespread damage. 

The timing of the flood has been devastating, as the current harvest looked for many farmers to be a bumper, with some of the best quality crops in years expected. 

Instead, much of rural New South Wales has been ravaged by floods which have destroyed many crops – or significantly downgraded the quality. 

While this is unlikely to have an impact on the food supply chain, it means prices are affected on a grower level. 

Many farmers will be selling produce for a much lower price, with wheat crops expected to be among the greatest impacted. 

Due to the importance of moisture content in wheat quality, rain affected wheat is generally only used for animal feeds – meaning farmers will be selling the crop for around 40 to 50 per cent less. 

The smaller returns for farmers will impact contracts and will have a flow-on effect which will see less money return to farms and local towns. 

This latest setback follows a drought, bushfires and a mouse plague, which have all challenged the agricultural sector over the past few years.

Farmers in northern New South Wales have returned to harvesting crops, after heavy rain caused widespread damage.

The timing of the flood has been devastating, as the current harvest looked for many farmers to be a bumper, with some of the best quality crops in years expected.

Instead, much of rural New South Wales has been ravaged by floods which have destroyed many crops – or significantly downgraded the quality.

While this is unlikely to have an impact on the food supply chain, it means prices are affected on a grower level.

Many farmers will be selling produce for a much lower price, with wheat crops expected to be among the greatest impacted.

Due to the importance of moisture content in wheat quality, rain affected wheat is generally only used for animal feeds – meaning farmers will be selling the crop for around 40 to 50 per cent less.

The smaller returns for farmers will impact contracts and will have a flow-on effect which will see less money return to farms and local towns.

This latest setback follows a drought, bushfires and a mouse plague, which have all challenged the agricultural sector over the past few years.
Farmers in northern New South Wales have returned to harvesting crops, after heavy rain caused widespread damage.

The timing of the flood has been devastating, as the current harvest looked for many farmers to be a bumper, with some of the best quality crops in years expected.

Instead, much of rural New South Wales has been ravaged by floods which have destroyed many crops – or significantly downgraded the quality.

While this is unlikely to have an impact on the food supply chain, it means prices are affected on a grower level.

Many farmers will be selling produce for a much lower price, with wheat crops expected to be among the greatest impacted.

Due to the importance of moisture content in wheat quality, rain affected wheat is generally only used for animal feeds – meaning farmers will be selling the crop for around 40 to 50 per cent less.

The smaller returns for farmers will impact contracts and will have a flow-on effect which will see less money return to farms and local towns.

This latest setback follows a drought, bushfires and a mouse plague, which have all challenged the agricultural sector over the past few years.

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