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Utahns collect at Capitol on Mother’s Day in assist of abortion rights



A bunch of about 100 folks spent a part of Sunday marching in opposition to the U.S. Supreme Court’s attainable reversal of Roe. v. Wade.

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) About 100 folks for a household pleasant “community walk” across the Utah Capitol to point out assist for the “health, well-being and bodily autonomy of women” on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8, 2022.

Three sisters approached the Utah Capitol on Sunday cloaked in purple hooded robes and little white bonnets meant to assist protect their faces. Each sister held an indication that learn ‘Of Alito’ ‘Of Thomas’ ‘Of Gorsuch,’ as chants from different pro-choice demonstrators echoed round them.

They had been three of the roughly 100 folks marching on the Capitol on Mother’s Day in assist of ladies’s bodily autonomy. Many marched across the perimeter of the Capitol, holding indicators and shouting chants like ‘Hey, hey, ho, ho the patriarchy has got to go.’

Jennie Morris purchased the three outfits the second she found the U.S. Supreme Court opinion signaled a attainable overturning of the landmark resolution Roe v. Wade, which protects constitutional abortion rights, was leaked.

“It just brought me right back to the show and how awful it was for women,” Morris mentioned referring to the favored TV drama ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ about fertile ladies who’re captured by the federal government and compelled to have youngsters to fight a fertility disaster. “It feels like it’s actually happening in real-time. And it’s unbelievable.”

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) l-r Paula Sheperd, Jennie Morris and Starla Holder joined about 100 folks for a household pleasant “community walk” across the Utah Capitol to point out assist for the “health, well-being and bodily autonomy of women” on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8, 2022.

Morris’s two sisters, Starla Holder and Paula Shepherd, stood beside her with the identical outfit and motive for exhibiting up on the Capitol—to protect the rights of future ladies and women who may have an abortion sooner or later, together with their very own youngsters.

One of the marching organizers, Juliet Reynolds, with Utah Alliance Coalition and founding father of the Murray Equity Alliance, was happy with the turnout on Mother’s Day.

“What a better tribute to show to mothers that our bodies are our control,” Reynolds mentioned with a raspy voice from all of the chanting. “We’re all mothers,” she mentioned pointing to the gang, “we’re here for our kids and we’re here for their choices.”

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) About 100 folks for a household pleasant “community walk” across the Utah Capitol to point out assist for the “health, well-being and bodily autonomy of women” on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8, 2022.

For the three sisters, marching on Mother’s Day was of explicit significance. Their youngsters joined them on the Capitol. So did their mom Karen Shepheard, a former Utah congresswoman. She served as a Democrat from 1993-1995 within the U.S. House of Representatives.

Shepheard remembers when the Supreme Court determined to uphold abortion as a constitutional proper in 1973. She had simply given beginning to her second baby and, whereas she knew she wouldn’t have anymore extra youngsters, she felt free and in control of her physique.

However, with the specter of Roe v. Wade being overturned, that’s modified since for Shepheard.

“This is the first constitutional right that has been taken away from anyone,” Shepheard mentioned. “Everything else has been expanding rights. But they’re taking away constitutional rights for women.”

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) About 100 folks for a household pleasant “community walk” across the Utah Capitol to point out assist for the “health, well-being and bodily autonomy of women” on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8, 2022.

Other attendees felt equally to Shepheard.

Kathy and Don Hudson confirmed up on the Capitol for his or her children, grandkids and great-grandchild. The combat over abortion and bodily autonomy is one thing Kathy lived by means of. And she fears if SCOTUS overturns Roe v. Wade that it might trigger a domino impact, threatening different protected rights.

“This [abortion] fight started so long ago, so long ago,” she mentioned, “and here we are again.”

“What if they try and take away contraception next? Or attack gay marriage?,” she mentioned

Editor’s observe • This story is on the market to Salt Lake Tribune subscribers solely. Thank you for supporting native journalism.



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